After Shalit, some IDF officers see dead soldier as better than abducted

01.10.2011                      04.Cheschwan. 5772

IDF:

After Shalit, some IDF officers see dead soldier as better than abducted

Return of abducted IDF soldier Gilad Shalit earlier this month, in exchange for 1,027 Palestinian prisoners, focuses IDF discussion on 'Hannibal Protocol,' designed to prevent soldier abduction.

Israel Defense Forces Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz reiterated on Monday that the so-called Hannibal Protocol, designed to prevent soldiers from being abducted, does not allow for a soldier to be killed in order to prevent his abduction. Gantz was addressing the IDF's operations forum, which includes combat unit commanders at the rank of lieutenant colonel and above. Much of the meeting was devoted to discussing the lessons of the Gilad Shalit episode.
The Hannibal Protocol has been highly controversial since its introduction in the late 1980s, after a few incidents in Israel's security zone in south Lebanon. It allows commanders to take whatever action is necessary, even at the risk of endangering the life of an abducted soldier, to foil the abduction. The policy was suspended in the last decade due to opposition from the public and reservist soldiers….